"This story is not fantastic; it is only romantic. Should we conclude that it isn’t true, given its implausibility? That would be a mistake. We are living in a time when anything can happen-one can almost say, when everything has happened. If our tale is not very likely today, it can be so tomorrow, thanks to the scientific resources that are the lot of the future, so no one should take it into his head to rank it among legends."

Jules Verne, The Castle in Transylvania. 

Henry Joseph Darger, Jr. ( ca. April 12, 1892 – April 13, 1973) was a reclusive American writer and artist who worked as a custodian in Chicago, Illinois. He has become famous for his posthumously-discovered 15,145-page, single-spaced fantasy manuscript called The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, along with several hundred drawings and watercolor paintings illustrating the story. Darger’s work has become one of the most celebrated examples of outsider art.

Avalon (アヴァロン Avalon?) is a 2001 Japanese-Polish science fiction drama film directed by Avalon (アヴァロン Avalon?) is a 2001 Japanese-Polish science fiction drama film directed by Mamoru Oshii and written by Kazunori Itō. The film stars Małgorzata Foremniak as a player in an illegal virtual reality video game. She must follow a quest to find a level in the game. Filming took place in Poland, in the cities of Wrocław and Warsaw.

 

Raymond Pettibon was born in Tucson, Arizona, in 1957. The fourth of five children, Pettibon earned a degree in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles. After graduating from college, Pettibon worked briefly as a high-school math teacher, but soon set out to launch a career as a professional artist. A cult figure among underground music devotees for his early work associated with the Los Angeles punk rock scene, Pettibon has acquired an international reputation as one of the foremost contemporary American artists working with drawing, text, and artist’s books.

Glen Baxter – icon of the surreal, London resident, and this Londonista’s favouritest living artist. His 1930s style sketches with their far-from-obvious but usually-side-splitting captions are a personal treasure, a bit like the music of Nina Simone, the scent of fresh roses or old episodes of Fawlty Towers – 100% guaranteed to put a smile on the face.

He is a prolific cartoonist, and has an impressive portfolio: since 1979 he has held umpteen exhibitions (in London most often at the Chris Beetles Gallery) across four continents, and has produced nearly twenty books of his work, some just collections, and others with a themed ‘story’. His pictures adorn some of the most influential walls of the land and have graced the pages of many national newspapers.

Caspar Milquetoast was a comic strip character created by H. T. Webster for his cartoon series, The Timid Soul. Webster described Caspar Milquetoast as “the man who speaks softly and gets hit with a big stick”. The character’s name is a deliberate misspelling of the name of a bland and fairly inoffensive food, milk toast. Milk toast, light and easy to digest, is an appropriate food for someone with a weak or “nervous” stomach.

"Certainly not! I didn’t build a machine to solve ridiculous crossword puzzles! That’s hack work, not Great Art! Just give it a topic, any topic, as difficult as you like…"Klapaucius thought, and thought some more. Finally he nodded and said:"Very well. Let’s have a love poem, lyrical, pastoral, and expressed in the language of pure mathematics. Tensor algebra mainly, with a little topology and higher calculus, if need be. But with feeling, you understand, and in the cybernetic spirit.""Love and tensor algebra?" Have you taken leave of your senses?" Trurl began, but stopped, for his electronic bard was already declaiming:
 

"Certainly not! I didn’t build a machine to solve ridiculous crossword puzzles! That’s hack work, not Great Art! Just give it a topic, any topic, as difficult as you like…"
Klapaucius thought, and thought some more. Finally he nodded and said:
"Very well. Let’s have a love poem, lyrical, pastoral, and expressed in the language of pure mathematics. Tensor algebra mainly, with a little topology and higher calculus, if need be. But with feeling, you understand, and in the cybernetic spirit."
"Love and tensor algebra?" Have you taken leave of your senses?" Trurl began, but stopped, for his electronic bard was already declaiming:

 

The difference between Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1972 film Solaris and more recent science fiction is summed up by the contents of the library on the space station suspended over an endlessly changing and apparently sentient alien ocean. The humans - struggling to stay sane as the ocean of Solaris tampers with their memories and consciousness - have Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow hanging in their wood-panelled library, a paradoxically warm and comforting image of hunters coming back empty-handed, cresting a wooded hill at the top of the village, their pack of hounds exhausted, while peasants play on the iced-over ponds in a white hollow below them.

Walead Beshty is particularly interested in shipping companies, specifically FedEx, and their efficiency and capability of delivering objects around the world. Beshty constructs glass vitrines that are the exact dimensions of a FedEx box, and he then places the glass boxes into a FedEx box and ships it to the exhibition site. The glass sculptures then show the wear and tear of its travels through “space and time.” This cracked surface is supposed to represent a record of the sculpture’s “hidden life” as though the sculpture were an exposure of a photograph. The FedEx boxes the sculpture is delivered in then becomes the base for the artwork. Beshty then gives the sculptures a title which consists of a record of the journey the box took to arrive at the exhibition.

Kurt Vonnegut: I want to share with you something I’ve learned. I’ll draw it on the blackboard behind me so you can follow more easily [draws a vertical line on the blackboard]. This is the G-I axis: good fortune-ill fortune. Death and terrible poverty, sickness down here—great prosperity, wonderful health up there. Your average state of affairs here in the middle [points to bottom, top, and middle of line respectively].

This is the B-E axis. B for beginning, E for entropy. Okay. Not every story has that very simple, very pretty shape that even a computer can understand [draws horizontal line extending from middle of G-I axis].